We Need to Discuss How Fucking Great The Frights Are

In his book Accidental Revolution: The Story of Grunge, Kyle Anderson writes that creating a universal appeal within music is, in essence, more difficult than originality. Granted, both entities are not easily achievable through music unless incredible amounts of innovation and grit are present – originality requires the willingness to create something that’s sonically unique, and a universal feeling within the work can only stem from a fierce determination to incorporate it. It’s an unbelievably delicate formula that few bands have been able to achieve an equalized ratio of. So, when a band does achieve this – and achieve it brilliantly, no less – it’s truly something to behold. This is precisely what makes The Frights such a delightful novelty.

The universalism in their music is embedded through the lyrics. With songs that detail the bizarre sense of emptiness that comes with growing up, change, detachment, longing, joy, and exhilaration, there is not one song in their discography that lacks an inherently relatable appeal. Each track perfectly encapsulates a facet of the human experience and wraps it in a delectable musical package. The lyrics are so very raw and authentic to the point where they yield the power to instantaneously catalyze a wave of emotion and memories within the listener. A piece of music can only be as strong as the connections formed to it, and this is something The Frights make to be absolutely effortless.

The high degree of lyrical realism is effortlessly coupled with addictive melodies and fantastic musical interplay. The guitar hooks are inventive and easily memorable, their sounds and details staining the brain. “You Are Going to Hate This,” the titular track from their most recent album, perfectly encapsulates this. In addition to showcasing the band’s ability to smoothly make rapid dynamic transitions, it also reveals their talent for bringing several distinctive musical elements together and streamlining them into cohesion, all while still maintaining their respective individual presence. This may seem like a stylistic contradiction – and it is – which is why it’s a hard thing to do. But The Frights do it, revealing an inherent level of craftsmanship within their work.

One of the most notable musical aspects of The Frights is the sheer dynamite that is its rhythm section. Bassist Richard Dotson and drummer Marc Finn are both powerful sonic entities on their own, and together they add a certain explosiveness that never fluctuates in its power regardless of the intensity of the song. This is particularly prevalent throughout the sheer blast of resonance that is “All I Need,” and their raw power is just as audibly palpable on the more  subdued “Puppy Knuckles” and “Afraid of the Dark” as well. The fact that the two are able to generate such a high degree of electricity regardless of a song’s mood, tempo, or volume speaks loudly of their attentiveness to technicality and craftsmanship.

With that being said, there’s not one bad song in their discography. This is something that can’t be said for every band, but objectively can be for The Frights (and yes, the word objectively was wholeheartedly intended). This is largely because each song is peppered with this incredible electric undercurrent that’s transmitted with an impressive ease. The tone or level of intensity is no matter, for it manifests in its own way regardless. It truly is something of a magic touch. Often times there is an extremely detectable change in energy among the songs that amass to a band’s body of work, but The Frights masterfully circumvent this common trap and maintain equalized sonic energy throughout. Let it be known that this is no easy feat, and the mastery of this is something that has hallmarked the careers of bands such as Black Flag, the Sex Pistols, and the Ramones. Regardless of the song or style, the listeners of these bands were made to feel as if they were truly hearing the band give their all. Yes, these artists have a strong association with the recent past, but in the landscape of the contemporary industry this quality is undeniably embodied by The Frights.

You don’t have to have a fucking clue about music to know that they’re are an incredibly talented band who excels at what they do. It’s truly that blatantly obvious. They are just indisputably brilliant.

The Frights embody quite literally everything that a seasoned rock connoisseur could possibly crave. Their overall sophistication and kaleidoscopic approach to composition are both entities that are impossible to not notice. They’re sonically and lyrically inventive, working creativity to its full breadth. Their live performances are extremely energetic, and the layers and nuances of their work reveal an immense attention to both creative and technical detail, thus creating the ultimate rock ‘n’ roll cocktail that will keep listeners going back for another round.

There’s no sense in mincing words: You fucking need to listen to The Frights. To learn more, click here to visit their website.

Image courtesy of iTunes

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